Listen Live! Rogue Tyger – Episode 3: The Pilot, Part 3 of 5

The adventure continues!

Join us on WERA-LP 96.7 FM just about now (4:10pm ET or so) for our first show, Rogue Tyger.

The crew of the Tyger must assess the damage done to their ship and themselves, all while trying to escape the ruthless enemy ships pursuing them.

Cast (in order of speaking):

Announcer: William R. Coughlan
Reg Macorum: Brooks Tegler
Shen Enling: Yasmin Tuazon
Aidan Vosky: Nick DePinto
Tormar: Phil Amico

Crew:

Recorded at Big Ben Studios by Matt Bostaph.
Production support by Meredith Sims.
Music was composed by John Maestri and arranged by Jason Chmiola.
Supplemental Recording at Tohubohu Productions in Burke, Virginia.
Dialogue and sound effects editing by Maurice Malde and Kim Davenport.
Additional sound mixing by William R. Coughlan.
Written and directed by Bjorn Munson.

Listen to the Episode Live!

Length: 8:11
Rated AD-G for general audiences. Contains fancy flying, sci-fi related peril, and discussion of injuries. The bad guys chasing the Tyger are rather mean after all.

Rating: AD-G

Rated AD-G (Audio Drama 'G')

Listen Live! Rogue Tyger – Episode 2: The Pilot, Part 2 of 5

Ready for a little adventure?

Join us on WERA-LP 96.7 FM just about now (4:00pm ET) for our first show, Rogue Tyger.

The crew of the Tyger are being pursued by a mysterious ship right after leaving the spaceport of Haapsalu. Are these simple, run-of-the-mill commerce raiders or something more sinister? More to the point, can they escape?

Cast (in order of speaking):

Announcer: William R. Coughlan
Reg Macorum: Brooks Tegler
Grainne Kochowa: Erin Goldstein
Aidan Vosky: Nick DePinto
Shen Enling: Yasmin Tuazon
Tormar: Phil Amico

Crew:

Recorded by Matt Bostaph at Big Ben Studios.
Production support by Meredith Sims.
Music was composed by John Maestri and arranged by Jason Chmiola.
Supplemental Recording at Tohubohu Productions in Burke, Virginia.
Dialogue and sound effects editing by Maurice Malde and Kim Davenport.
Additional sound mixing by William R. Coughlan.
Written and directed by Bjorn Munson.

Listen to the Episode Live!

Length: 7:50
Rated AD-G for general audiences. Contains adventure, aerobraking, and all sorts of rocketry.

Rated AD-G (Audio Drama 'G')

Where We’ll Be (Online): Podtales Conference 2020

We weren’t able to make it in person last year, but we’ve heard so many good things, we’re actually kind of glad that we can attend the Podtales online festival of audio drama and fiction podcasting.

In part to acknowledge the fact that it’s not going to be one, concentrated, in-person weekend, the events are spread over the first three weekends of November… and in fact, there’s stuff happening right now on their Discord server (yet another 21st century way to meet, mingle, and converse). They also have a showcase of podcasts going on throughout the festival you may want to check out.

We hope to see some of you there (online)!

Listen Live! Rogue Tyger – Episode 1: The Pilot, Part 1 of 5

Ready for a little adventure?

Join us on WERA-LP 96.7 FM just about now (4pm ET, following a JAT Chat) for our first show, Rogue Tyger.

Aidan Vosky, a youth trapped on an uneventful planet in the backwater Haapsalu system longs to travel among the stars. He goes to the spaceport in an effort to join the crew of one of the vessels… but may get more than he bargained for when he meets the crew of the Tyger.

Cast (in order of speaking):

Announcer: William R. Coughlan
Fruit Seller: Bjorn Munson
Aidan Vosky: Nick DePinto
Spacer Captain: Phil Amico
Alien Captain: William R. Coughlan
Reg Macorum: Brooks Tegler
Shen Enling: Yasmin Tuazon
Tormar: Phil Amico
Grainne Kochowa: Erin Goldstein

Crew:

Recorded by Matt Bostaph at Big Ben Studios.
Production support by Meredith Sims.
Music was composed by John Maestri and arranged by Jason Chmiola.
Supplemental Recording at Tohubohu Productions in Burke, Virginia.
Dialogue and sound effects editing by Maurice Malde and Kim Davenport.
Additional sound mixing by William R. Coughlan.
Written and directed by Bjorn Munson.

LISTEN LIVE

Length: 10:47
Rated AD-G for general audiences. Contains youthful idealism, non-human prejudice, and occasional high g-forces.

Rated AD-G (Audio Drama 'G')

Some Classic Audio Frights for Your Halloween

Audio drama is often described as “the theater of the mind” and some of the best horror stories leave things up to one’s imagination. So it really shouldn’t come as any surprise that there are some top notch horror radio programs from the days of yore.

When we think of rating things at PG: parental guidance suggested, these two favorites are some of the programs we’re thinking about:

Suspense – The House in Cypress Canyon

Escape – Three Skeleton Key (with Vincent Price)

Also, if you’ve thought to yourself, “Yeah, these are classics and all, but what if I want vintage radio with Australian voices?” Well, you’re in luck!

Finally, we’re happy to announce that another local theater company, The Arlington Players, is getting in on the War of the Worlds action, using the original 1938 Howard Koch script used so successfully by Orson Welles back in the day.

You can hear it streaming live Halloween night (tomorrow!) at 6pm ET on our home station: WERA 96.7!

Remember, stay safe and spook responsibly.

Listen Online! Through a Glass, Darkly – Episode 6: The Masque of the Red Death and The Raven

“The Raven” by Edgar Allen Poe (originally published 1845)

“The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allen Poe (originally published 1842)

Both performed by William R. Coughlan 

Crew:

Sound editing and final mixing by William R. Coughlan.

Length: 28:18

Rated AD-PG, parental guidance suggested. “The Raven” is essentially typical Poe existential dread which, unless you’ve recently seen Hitchcock’s “The Birds” should be fine. “The Masque of the Red Death,” however, may be upsetting to people hit hard by the global pandemic due to its depiction of the titular disease.

Rated AD-PG (Audio Drama “PG”)

New Writer’s Agreement for Scripted Podcasts

In a sign that the larger entertainment industry is re-discovering audio fiction, the Writer’s Guild of America, East (WGAe) has created a new agreement specifically for scripted podcasts, which you read all about on their website here.

The folks over at Radio Drama Revival have an in-depth interview with some of the people who have been organized the agreement for the WGAe.

Part of this organizing has been creating the WGA Audio Alliance, which includes creating a scripted writers’ database among other things.

While this doesn’t directly impact our work here at Jabberwocky Audio Theater, we’re interested to see how the industry continues to develop.

Listen Live! Through a Glass, Darkly – Episode 6: The Masque of the Red Death and The Raven

Join us just about now (4pm ET) for a special Halloween week episode of Through a Glass, Darkly.

“The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe (originally published 1845)

“The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe (originally published 1842)

Both performed by William R. Coughlan 

Crew:

Sound editing and final mixing by William R. Coughlan.

Listen to the Episode Live!

Length: 27:59

Rated AD-PG, parental guidance suggested. “The Raven” is essentially typical Poe existential dread which, unless you’ve recently seen Hitchcock’s “The Birds” should be fine. “The Masque of the Red Death,” however, may be upsetting to people hit hard by the global pandemic due to its depiction of the titular disease.

Rated AD-PG (Audio Drama “PG”)

Show Notes: Prince Prigio

Having recently completed our production of “Prince Prigio,” we wanted to thank our Patreon subscribers by providing some additional information about the production.

“Prince Prigio” eyed for Adaptation from the Start

Besides original series like Rogue Tyger and Quorum, we knew we’d want to adapt some classic adventures for Jabberwocky Audio Theater: adventures and cliffhangers and fantastical tales being one of the general touchpoints of our productions.

So even before the idea of Through the Looking Glass took form, Bjorn knew he wanted to adapt “Prince Prigio,” since it was one of his favorite fairy tales growing up — and quite modern for being over 100 years old.

One idea was to make a full-cast audio production like our main shows, but both because of the pandemic precautions and the speed at which we needed to record, having an adaptation that was an almost straight reading of the text felt the most expedient.

As it happens, this approach of ‘a main narrator with other voices piping in’ worked very well for “Prince Prigio” and may work for other productions — though we may find a bit more adaptation will be needed (more on that below).

Creating the Script: Chapters vs. Parts

One of the first hurdles was how to break up the story for broadcast. “Prince Prigio” is over 18,000 words and we weren’t going to cut it down to fit into a single half-hour episode… or even a two-parter.

Moreover, our “half hour episodes” actually need to come in no longer than 28 minutes for radio broadcast, and of those 28 minutes, two or three should be devoted to opening and ending credits. So basically, we’re looking at about 25 minutes per episode tops.

Now one thing we’ve learned from working on Through the Looking Glass is to estimate a narrator’s speaking time. So far, it runs from about 130 words a minute to 150 words per minute, depending on factors such as the narrator’s default pace for the story, how many characters they voice, and the story action. For example, a chase scene will have a naturally more frantic pace then describing a feast.

We’ve learned to be cautious in our estimates and try for 130 words per minute. That means that “Prince Prigio” would be at least 5 parts. And to give us even more wiggle room –there might be musical transitions or sound effects to sell a scene– we were looking at a six-part series.

Meanwhile, “Prince Prigio” had 18 chapters, and a quick look at the chapters found that, like just about any chapters of a book, they’re uneven. At the 25-minute mark, we couldn’t easily end at the end of the chapter. Not only that, we couldn’t end at a chapter neatly and consistently at the 22-minute mark, the 23-minute mark, or the 24-minute mark.

So we had to make a choice of whether to follow the chapters and have episodes of wildly different lengths… or to follow our broadcast format and find a way to make the adaptation work.

Since we’re an audio production that’s broadcast on the radio in a very specific format, we decided to figure out a way to make the episodes work ending mid-chapter. Luckily, the source material provided a clue for how this could happen. The narrator, one can assume a somewhat silly avatar of author Andrew Lang himself, occasionally comments on the action of the story and his telling of it, not unlike how William Goldman talks about having to adapt the ficticious Simon “S.” Morgenstern’s Princess Bride: it’s all another droll layer to the meta fairy tale.

The trick then became to “hang a lantern” on the fact that the episodes were not ending neatly at the end of chapters in most cases, and have our fictitious narrator get rather fussy about it. We’re biased, but we think this adds a fun dimension to the production.

The rest of the show notes are available to our Patreon Subscribers.

Casting the Parts

Getting the Recordings and Editing

Generating Production Estimates for the Future

We’re so thankful for our Patreon supporters that help us keep bringing new stories to air!