Listen Online! Through a Glass, Darkly – Episode 7: The Tell-Tale Heart

“The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allen Poe (first published in James Russel Lowell’s The Pioneer, January 1843).

Performed by Tegan Cohan, who appears courtesy of Howl at the Moon Audio.

Edited, mixed and mastered by William R. Coughlan.

Post-production services supplied by Tohubohu Productions, LLC.

Length: 20:24

Rated AD-PG, parental guidance suggested. Contains murder, dismemberment, and someone who insists they are not mad a bit too much.

AIM Calls for Aid!

As many of you know, our shows start on broadcast radio, WERA-LP 96.7 FM in Arlington, Virginia to be precise.

WERA is community radio, as in the program literally comes from the community. And it gives back, with news, coverage of local events, and some of the best value in media training around (which includes TV as well, since WERA is part of Arlington Independent Media).

But it also depends on the community for financial support in the best of times, so this past year has hit them hard, and Arlington Independent Media is looking to keep on going through their 39th year and beyond. They’ve been integral to our getting Jabberwocky Audio Theater off the ground again in 2018 and we’d love to see them continue.

Besides straight-up donating to them, they also have an auction going on as well as a special virtual concert fundraiser this weekend. Spread the word!

The Cicadas are Coming! The Cicadas are Coming!

We mentioned last month that Brood X, the prodigious cohort of cicadas that emerge every 17 years to mate and be quite loud about it, are coming this year — possibly near you!

Now, if you’re recording audio like us, this just might impact your production schedule… and maybe you want to record them on purpose.

For those of you who want more of the science behind it all, here’s Mike Raupp, the “Bug Guy” and avowed cicada fan to give you all the details you didn’t know you needed.

Spring 2021 Book Giveaway: Locke and Key

Now through –TODAY– March 19th, we’re banding with several other indie creators to give one lucky winner $300 worth of sci-fi and fantasy books.

The giveaway collection includes works that we love to share because of our own connections to the story as well as works we’d love to get. Just like Monstress, the first volume of Locke and Key is one I’ve been meaning to read.

Ancient evils, demon possession, locksmithing… what’s not to like?

Unlike Saga, this has been made into a TV series, so I suppose I could check that out first. I mean, it’s been working out for The Expanse.

For a chance to explore this and other stories, don’t forget to sign up for the giveaway by TODAY, Friday, March 19th!

~Bjorn Munson, Artistic Director, JAT

Spring 2021 Book Giveaway: Monstress

Now through –TOMORROW– March 19th, we’re banding with several other indie creators to give one lucky winner $300 worth of sci-fi and fantasy books.

The giveaway collection includes works that we love to share because of our own connections to the story as well as works we’d love to get. Monstress is in the latter category.

Just like Saga, this has been recommended to me. Unlike Saga, I haven’t had a chance to read it… yet. But I continue to hear nothing but good thing’s about Marjorie Liu’s writing – and the prospect for more epic world-building is always welcome.

For a chance to explore this and other stories, don’t forget to sign up for the giveaway by tomorrow, Friday, March 19th!

~Bjorn Munson, Artistic Director, JAT

Spring 2021 Book Giveaway: Saga

Now through –THIS FRIDAY– March 19th, we’re banding with several other indie creators to give one lucky winner $300 worth of sci-fi and fantasy books.

Part of the prize collection is the first volume of the one of my favorite recent comics/graphic novels: Saga.

The star-crossed heroes are imperfect, the world-building is purposeful and intricate, and I absolutely love the art of Fiona Staples. It’s an epic and often bloody space opera/fantasy that was first introduced to me at my Friendly Local Comic Shop (which has since closed its doors). Come for the action and irreverance. Stay for the compelling characters!

For a chance to explore this and other stories, don’t forget to sign up for the giveaway before this coming Friday!

~Bjorn Munson, Artistic Director, JAT

Imperium Encyclopedia in Depth: Grainne Kochowa

If you’ve been enjoying Rogue Tyger, have you checked out the Encyclopedia of the Imperium yet? It’s the definitive source for the history of the Seven Systems and the greater Imperium.

Art by Javier Charro

Grainne Kochowa

(b. 337 SIY) Arang Pelaiyu pilot associated with the Flatrock enclave and the freighter Tyger.

Grainne Kochowa is believed to have been born in the 4th century of the Imperium on the ocean world of Merso, part of the holdings of House Malde.

While the location of an Arang Pelaiyu not in Imperial service can sometimes be difficult, enclaves keep scrupulous genealogical records. In this case, the Battle of Merso in 431, a violent conflict typical of the late stages of the Border Wars, included the destruction of the enclave along with the rest of the main lagrange station. The oceans were further poisoned by toxic chemicals in the wreckage that impacted the surface, making the underwater settlements uninhabitable. Records regarding Grainne Kochowa’s early life and education are therefore lost.

The Arang Pelaiyu of Merso, displaying their species’ traditional stoicism, took the tragedy in stride and spread to other enclaves among the Imperium. Kochowa is listed as part of the group arriving in Flatrock in SIY 432. She is then listed in some late war dispatches, serving as a relief shuttle pilot. Review of historical records show she may have helped rescue over 500 souls fleeing the siege of Urmia.

Kochowa is believed to have continued to work as a pilot on and around Flatrock for the next few decades, often for medical and relief transports. Her name appears listed in flight plans for the Tyger beginning in late SIY 470.

Note: this entry will be updated with events from 473 SIY onward after reviewing newly acquired historical documents.


You’ve just read the “in-universe” entry of Grainne Kochowa. To learn more about the development of his character and more behind-the-scenes trivia, become a backer on Patreon to get this and other bonus content.

Spring 2021 Book Giveaway: Neil Gaiman

Now through –THIS FRIDAY– March 19th, we’re banding with several other indie creators to give one lucky winner $300 worth of sci-fi and fantasy books.

In an instance I suspect is far from rare, I stumbled onto Neil Gaiman when I borrowed some of my brother’s Sandman comics… and then I kept following what he was doing which, as many of you know, has branched out to just about every storytelling medium from comics to TV to film to audio drama.

If you’ve enjoyed Gaiman’s work, you’ll probably have noted how much he loves to delve into the history and lore of behind whatever type of story he’s telling. You get the sense, from his writing, that his childhood –like many of ours– had the library as a focal point. It’s something that he himself has confirmed in interviews.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane takes a premise of a man returning to his home town for a funeral — something we feel we’ve seen in many a story — and then gives it some fantastical, magic realist twists, sprinkled with events inspired by the author’s own life. It’s a captivating read and, if you haven’t read it before, I think you’ll find it a page turner, especially if you’ve enjoyed Gaiman’s other works.

For a chance to dive into this and other stories, don’t forget to sign up for the giveaway before this coming Friday!

~Bjorn Munson, Artistic Director, JAT

Spring 2021 Book Giveaway: The Martian

Now through March 19th, we’re banding with several other indie creators to give one lucky winner $300 worth of sci-fi and fantasy books.

I was writing yesterday about how one of the prizes for this giveaway is a boxed set of The Expanse, the series of space opera novels made into an the TV series of the same name.

One of the enjoyable aspects of the show –something I understand is in the books as well– is the relatively “hard” sci-fi setting. Ships have to worry about gravity and the lack thereof. There are no ray guns, hyperdrives, or teleporters. Sure, there’s that pesky, physics-defying protomolecule and related shenanigans, but Arthur C. Clarke has your back.

In the realm of hard sci-fi in the very near future, we also have The Martian, which scratched that “science the science” itch I sometime have. It’s kind of like Clarke’s zeal for plausible science matched with Tom Clancy’s zeal for researching technical specifications (as readers of The Hunt for Red October may recall).

The movie’s nice too, but there’s something wonderfully detailed about the novel that makes it a fun page-turner.

For a chance to dive into this and other stories, don’t forget to sign up for the giveaway before this coming Friday!

~Bjorn Munson, Artistic Director, JAT