Quorum — The Gambler’s Tale: “All That Glitters,” Part 6 of 10

July 2012. Jimmy Harmon and Robin Freeman have managed to find the hidden documents they’ve been seeking — but after finding themselves unexpectedly cornered by corrupt police detective Malone, they must find a way to escape the homicidal gunman. Moreover, Harmon is anxious to complete the perilous assignment he has taken on from venture capitalist Anton Kreitzer… but he may discover his troubles are more connected than he realized.

LISTEN TO THE EPISODE

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Length: 35:16

Rated AD-PG, so parental guidance is suggested
Contains semi-adult language (“SOB,” a few uses of variants of “damn,” three uses of “hell,” JC’s name taken in vain, use of “Godawful,” “screwed” and “screwed up”), gambling (horse racing), identity theft and trespassing, drinking alcohol (and a veiled reference to underage drinking), and two egregious instances of illegal parking.

Cast (in order of speaking)

Announcer: Marsha Rehns
Jimmy Harmon: Cameron McNary
Robin Freeman: Emily H. Gilson
Joe Santoro: Tony Quinn
Malone: Ricardo Padilla
Registry Security Guard: James E. Lewis
Racing Announcer: Bob Hurley
Anton Kreitzer: Pete Papageorge
Eleanor Wallis: Ariana Almajan
Glen Chambers: Kevin Murray
Gabriel: Greg Jones Ellis
Tom: Tom Kramer
Paul: James Whalen

Crew

Recorded at Tulgey Wood Studios in Deepest Springfield
Supplemental recording at various other studios throughout the area
Music by Brooks Tegler
Dialogue and sound effects editing, mastering and final mixing by William R. Coughlan
Produced by Bjorn Munson
Written and directed by William R. Coughlan

Music Selections

Early in the Morning
composed by Clyde Hunt
performed by Brooks Tegler’s Hot Jazz
from the album And Not Only That!
Amazon | iTunes

Waiting and Pacing the Dim Lit Room
performed by Humans Win (Lance Conrad)

Quorum Profile: Bob Hurley

With this Fall’s broadcast of “The Gambler’s Tale: All That Glitters,” we’re looking at the voices behind this season of Quorum, continuing with the Featured Players.

Bob Hurley

Bob Hurley
Racing Announcer

After a career as a video editor/editing supervisor at ABC News in Washington, Hurley became a full-time voice actor in 2009. He was the Movies and Specials voice for the OSN Network in 24 countries and found himself voicing commercials for the past 10 years. In addition to his commercial work, he can be heard voicing the open and close of the PBS NewsHour. He is also the voice of the drunken Scotchmo in the Wasteland series of video games, which may or may not be considered acting depending on where you met him.

Quorum Profile: Patrick Kirchner

With this Fall’s broadcast of “The Gambler’s Tale: All That Glitters,” we’re looking at the voices behind this season of Quorum, continuing with the Featured Players.

Patrick Kirchner

Patrick Kirchner
Ford

Patrick Kirchner is the owner of Sound Attention LLC, a voiceover and media production company in Woodbridge, Virginia. Born with a passion for compelling storytelling, Patrick’s resonant bass-baritone voice can be heard in national broadcast commercials, eLearning, animation, audiobooks, and other genres. He was a 2019 Voice Arts ® Awards nominee, and the recipient of the 2020 One Voice USA Inspiration Award for his dedicated efforts as a mentor in the voiceover community.

“Prince Prigio” Receives Multiple TIVA Awards

2020 was a transformative year for us as we needed to adapt to trying to do large cast audio dramas remotely (preferring the old school everyone-in-the-same-room approach has served us well). Our first large-scale attempt at this was with a six-part adaptation of “Prince Prigio” for our anthology series Through the Looking Glass.

We’re pleased to announce that the cast and crew’s hard work has been recognized as we received not one, but three TIVA Peer Awards at this year’s ceremony:

  • Peer Bronze: Web Series (Through the Looking Glass)
  • Peer Silver: Acting Voice Over – Audio Narration, Male (Bjorn Munson)
  • Peer Gold: Sound Mixing (William R. Coughlan)

Quorum Profile: James Whalen

With this Fall’s broadcast of “The Gambler’s Tale: All That Glitters,” we’re looking at the voices behind this season of Quorum, continuing with the Featured Players.

James Whalen

James Whalen
Paul

James Whalen last appeared at Woolly Mammoth as Lawrence in Shipwreck. His most recent DC area appearances include The Heiress (Arena Stage), Small Mouth Sounds (Round House Theatre) and True West (Rep Stage). He has also performed locally with The Kennedy Center, The Olney Theatre Center, Everyman Theatre, Mosaic Theatre, The Shakespeare Theatre Company, as well as Theatre J. Regionally he played Dracula at Actors Theatre of Louisville. Some of his favorite TV and film credits include House of Cards, VEEP, I Love You But I Lied, Money Matters, Number One with a Bullet, and A Beautiful Mind.

P.S. You know how the conversations between Tom and Paul seem a bit… puzzling? Almost like they’re speaking in code? Definitely don’t read anything into that. Nope. Definitely not a clue that would make the Quorum upset.

Quorum Profile: Tom Kramer

With this Fall’s broadcast of “The Gambler’s Tale: All That Glitters,” we’re looking at the voices behind this season of Quorum, continuing with the Featured Players.

Tom Kramer

Tom Kramer
Tom

Tom is thrilled to be reunited with Bjorn Munson for this production of Quorum.  (He and Bjorn were classmates at Beloit College in the mid 1990s; back when dorm rooms had telephones and students didn’t have email addresses.) Tom spent the subsequent years primarily in broadcasting, reporting for radio and TV stations in Illinois, Iowa, and Michigan.  His reporting has been recognized by the Associated Press, the respective state news associations of Iowa and Michigan, and occasionally by a relative.  His mother has more than once asked if that was him she just heard on the radio. These days, he is a voice actor (www.tomkramervoice.com). His voice can be heard nation-wide supporting a variety of products, services, and businesses.  He and his wife, Mandy, 5 kids, 5 dogs, 3 cats, and innumerable chickens do their best to stay busy in Northern Michigan.

P.S. You know how the conversations between Tom and Paul seem a bit… puzzling? Almost like they’re speaking in code? Definitely don’t read anything into that. Nope. Definitely not a clue that would make the Quorum upset.

Quorum — The Gambler’s Tale: “All That Glitters,” Part 5 of 10

July 2012. Having eluded his ill-intentioned pursuers with the help of skilled performance driver Eleanor Wallis, Jimmy Harmon meets up with his ex-girlfriend Robin. Upon learning that her involvement in the sequence of events that led to her coworkers’ disappearance remains undiscovered, Jimmy hatches a plan to recover the hidden documentation that may shed light on the group’s hidden motives… a plan that requires the assistance of a less-than-reputable acquaintance from his Las Vegas days.

LISTEN TO THE EPISODE

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AD-PG

Length: 27:54

Rated AD-PG, so parental guidance is suggested
Contains semi-adult language (two instances of “SOB,” severeal uses of “crap” or variants thereof, “screwed up,” “God” used as an exclamation, uses of “damn” and associated variations, use of JC’s name in vain, and two uses of “hell”), horse-race gambling (horse racing), a dead body, a surprisingly detailed depiction of identity theft, and trespassing.

Cast (in order of speaking)

Announcer: Marsha Rehns
Jimmy Harmon: Cameron McNary
Robin Freeman: Emily H. Gilson
Skitch: Mike Bernal
Joe Santoro: Tony Quinn
Glen Chambers: Kevin Murray
Farah: Liz Christmas
Registry Security Guard: James E. Lewis
Racing Announcer: Bob Hurley
Tom: Tom Kramer
Paul: James Whalen

Crew

Recorded at Tulgey Wood Studios in Deepest Springfield
Supplemental recording at various other studios throughout the area
Music by Brooks Tegler
Dialogue and sound effects editing, mastering and final mixing by William R. Coughlan
Produced by Bjorn Munson
Written and directed by William R. Coughlan

Music Selections

Early in the Morning
composed by Clyde Hunt
performed by Brooks Tegler’s Hot Jazz
from the album And Not Only That!
Amazon | iTunes

Let the Reaper Wild
performed by Humans Win (Lance Conrad)

You So Bad
performed by Ilya Zhornik

Speedy Delivery: The Messenger’s Tale

This article excerpt, part of a series entitled The Quorum Chronicle, appears in full — along with expanded audio content — exclusively for our Patreon backers. See our Patreon page for further details.


The Quorum ChronicleWorking in the design field in the days before the ubiquity of PDF documents and digital signatures, I had more than my share of experience with bicycle messengers. Whether sending design edits back-and-forth with a client, or checking proofs from a printer, bicycle messengers — with their trademark neon-spandex outfits and omnipresent single-strap messenger bags — were the go-to-delivery method for items that needed to get across town too quickly for regular delivery services, but which couldn’t be sent as faxes or scans because of their sensitivity or need for accuracy. (To this day, on-screen proofs are no real substitute for verifying printed colors off the press.)

At its height, the bicycle courier industry in Washington, DC, where The Messenger’s Tale takes place, had upwards of 400 riders.

Bicycle couriers have actually been around since the nineteenth century, with bicycles being used to transport mail and other documents, as well as for telegraph message delivery. But what we traditionally think of as the bicycle courier industry was born shortly after the second World War, when Carl Sparks founded a dedicated bicycle delivery service — called, appropriately enough, Sparkies — in San Francisco. Throughout the late twentieth century, the industry gradually developed a distinct counter-culture image, with messengers often viewed as hardcore, punk rock-infused anarchists. But across the 1980s and ’90s, a more collaborative atmosphere began to permeate the industry, and affinity groups for bicycle couriers began springing up, such as the Messenger Courier Association of America, as well as communal events like the Cycle Messenger World Championships, an annual competition composed of both proper cycling races and various stunts and activities meant to replicate the kinds of actions couriers encounter as a part of their daily work routines. And couriers also participate in so-called “alley cat” races — underground, unsanctioned competitions organized in cities around the world.

The technology used by bicycle messengers has changed dramatically over the years, from the early days of paper maps and in-person dispatching to two-way radios, mobile phones and GPS systems. But one area in which technology seems to have reversed — particularly since the mid-2000s — is in the only true requirement for being a bicycle courier: the bicycle itself. While messengers have long made use of a wide range of cycle types, based on everything from local terrain to personal preference, one notable standout among couriers is the fixed-gear cycle, or “fixie.” A kind of throwback to the very first bicycles ever built, a fixie has no freewheel mechanism — the rear wheel sprocket is locked to the wheel hub, meaning that pedal movement and wheel movement are locked in sync. This means the bicycle has no ability to coast — if the wheels are moving, the pedals are moving. But this also means the rider can use reverse pedal motion to brake, or even move in reverse. In point of fact, many bicycles in use have removed dedicated brakes entirely, relying solely on the rider’s own leg power. While all of this may seem odd, even anachronistic, the fixie does have several advantages. For one, not having the extra equipment makes the bike notably lighter than its more fully geared counterparts. For another, the reduced complexity of the design reduces the chance of mechanical failure — a critical concern when your livelihood depends on reliability. Many cyclists believe a fixed-wheel cycle gives them greater control, though this assertion is questioned by just as many others. And ultimately, such a simple, basic bicycle may be less attractive to bicycle thieves, an all-too-common danger in urban environments.


Be sure to check out the complete article, in both text and enhanced audio formats, along with the rest of The Quorum Chronicle series, at our Patreon page. And thanks so much for your continuing support of Jabberwocky Audio Theater!

— William R. Coughlan, writer/director of Quorum

Quorum Profile: Liz Christmas

With this Fall’s broadcast of “The Gambler’s Tale: All That Glitters,” we’re looking at the voices behind this season of Quorum, continuing with the Featured Players.

Liz Christmas

Liz Christmas
Farah

Liz Christmas is an actor living and learning in Maryland. She is currently expanding her voiceover skills while working out of a home studio environment. Her handle is @xmasliz on Instagram.

Quorum Profile: Daniel Rylee Bush

With this Fall’s broadcast of “The Gambler’s Tale: All That Glitters,” we’re looking at the voices behind this season of Quorum, continuing with the Featured Players.

Daniel Rylee Bush

Daniel Rylee Bush
Parker Wells

Daniel is an Actor and Musician based in New York City. In his free time, he likes to walk the city with his camera, experience the outdoors, and try new restaurants. Daniel attended Shenandoah Conservatory and subsequently moved to New York City to pursue acting. He is excited and grateful to once more be a part of the Quorum series, and hopes you enjoy listening.